Friday, August 07, 2009

Bench of the week (20)

This week we are back in Lindås, north of Bergen, at a small place called Vassel. The bench is as simple and natural as it can be - plain timber along the foundation of this old house. Just the place so sit and enjoy the late night Northern atmosphere. I have shown the view from here before.

There are indeed two of these benches

And it is not an ordinary house either. It was once a a schoolhouse, built in 1886 in the traditional style of the area. It served its purpose for many years, but was closed down some time in the 60's. Later, a few local enthusiasts started a campaign to preserve the school as a museum. They collected relevant furniture, equipment and teaching material, and they tried to recreate a late 19th Century school as far as possible. It became Lindås Skulemuseum. Then it was given to the local authorities for future care.

However, as it is all to plain to see, the local authorities has not been very good at this and I must admit that I do not have high hopes for the future with the present political leadership in this area. Not all people see the worth of history.

Which is a pity, since my grandfather was once a teacher here.

My own interest in benches stems from the site published by PERBS and Kerri and the site published by Malyss. Also, others have shown an interest in the subject, so I have started to take photos of benches when I "stumble" across one and post them on Fridays. It is not a "proper" meme, but if anyone else would like to join me in publishing benches on Fridays, they are of course welcome to do so. Give me a hint and I'll come visiting - summer permitting :-)

32 comments:

Phoenix C. said...

What beautiful benches. I love the grain on the first photo, one could almost feel it's texture!

I hope the school-museum has a future - history is so irreplaceable.

(I've a bench post this week again!)

Dimple said...

I like the context of the benches. I hope the authorities will appreciate the history in this building and make preserving it a priority.
I have a bench post today, also.

Barbara Martin said...

A beautiful bench in its natural form. The history of this building was interesting, though sometimes civil authorities need to be reminded that others are still interested in the building.

My bench is up.

Pam said...

Great photos with such interesting history particularly with your granfather teaching. My bench is posted.

PERBS said...

I saw many like that or with a couple short logs under them at Mount Rainier and have yet to publish them all but will get around to it one day. I hope they save the old school and don't let it destruct itself again. How neat that your Father was a teacher. Is he still alive? What did he teach? I know . . . kids. lol What grade level?

Drop by and see the bench I did use for today -- I have never seen one like it before.

Dagrun said...

Så trist at det bare forfaller. Sånne gamle skoler er viktige historiske monumenter.

Enkel og flott benk som nok mang en ung bakende har hvilt på... rart å tenke på.

imac said...

Another beauty Rune,
Its the way of the world of today,
To leave beauty to rot and decay.

The Cowgirl said...

Benches, clever. I am always snapping pics of unusual benches that I see. They tend to tell a story of the location.

Malyss said...

The benches seem to have been made in one single tree trunk simply cut into two parts.. Simple and efficient.
The story of this lovely little school is sad, but so representative of the actual way of acting from the politics: No profit, no interest.
I think citizens will have to care again. Otherwise, Take a lot of pictures before complete disappearing..

Heges fotoblogg said...

Enkelt og praktisk! Ser ut til at høyden er tilpasset korte barn og ikke lange voksne :-)

Det er synd at museet ikke blir vedlikeholdt. Hvordan skal dagens barn forstå historien hvis alt det gamle forsvinner?

Anne-Berit said...

Dette minnet meg om skolehuset på min mors heimplass.Der hadde de også benker langs veggene som der,kjærestebenker,som de kalte det for å erte ungene litt.
Veldig fine og koselige bilder du viser her.
God fredag til deg.

Abraham Lincoln said...

I overslept. You would think that I would wake up my usual time 4-5 AM on my first day on the job, but today it was 6 AM and I saw your reminder. Friday. Bench day. So I did find one. And I am switching to Windows Live Writer to blog and it takes me a while to remember what steps to go through. The result is on my Pick a Peck of Pixels

Rune (Bildebloggen) said...

Trist at slikt ikke blir bevart, mye historie er på vei ut og bort. Ser ut som benkene holder relativt god stand i alle fall. :)

Har noen benker ute i dag jeg også hvis du har lyst til å svinge innom meg: http://www.bildebloggen.com/2009/08/god-helg-33/

Prospero said...

There's something about the simplicity of these benches that make them fascinating. I really like the first photo, with the verdant backdrop.

Dina said...

What a fine feeling it must be to sit on a log bench outside the school where your grandfather taught. That's history.

I posted one of the few benches in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Nothing special, but a story behind it.

Dagrun said...

ps, nå har jeg posted min egen benk her: http://bilderdagrun.blogspot.com/2009/08/bench-of-week.html

AL said...

The photo of the bench made me smile, it looks like the same old bench that I see in the countryside which I would also like to have and do you know that that kind of bench is very expensive because of it's antiquity?

BTW I found your blog through Abe Lincoln.

Jeni said...

Upon first glance at the first picture in this "bench" series, I was ready to write and tell you that you somehow must have made a visit to the States and in that visit, you were at the site (about 14 miles from where I live) along the parade route for that town's annual Fireman's Parade and not only that, you'd taken a picture of the log my daughter and her children and I aim to take possession of while we watch the parade! But then on the next picture down (I think it was the next one down) there I saw the building and knew it was just my old eyes playing visual tricks on me!
Still, it was a great set of pictures to behold!
Peace.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

How sad the local authorities are not keeping this old school in good condition. I think it's good for future generations to see what life was like in the past...and not just read about it in books.

I have a bench up again this week at
http://eastgwillimburywow.blogspot.com/2009/08/hazy-view-bench.html

sonia a. mascaro said...

Great photos! Love the idea about serie of benches, I like so much benches too.

Malyss said...

I went to see Gadrun's bench, and found her picture of bench really wonderful ; Thank you for the link; I also visited her blog and noticed she came around here some times ago?..Ü; she makes very beautyful pictures. I still have a lot to learn !( a good way to stay young: going on learning every day!)
Have a nice week-end!

Tom said...

This is an interesting post Rune... love these benches and I can imagine all the tales and stories told by the school children.. I hope this place is looked after in the future...

Tom
My blogs today both show benches Park Bench and a Bag Lady ?

Anne said...

Meget meget interessant post Rune, historien og ikke minst at bestefaren din har lagt ned mye av sjela si der da.

Andre tider, andre verdier, andre hjelpemidler, men du skal ikke se bort fra at de faktisk hadde det bedre...

Glemmer stadig benkene på fredag jeg, har jo mange mange i en mappe her jo...

Fredagsklem

Anne said...

NÅ kan du sitte et lite minutt på benken min :-)

John said...

A great piece of wood, nicely spotted.

Lauren said...

That is such a neat little piece of history and so cool that your grandfather used to teach there! I hope they keep better care of it.

GMG said...

Hi Rune! 08.08 always deserves a bit of champagne; at least for those who got married some 34 years ago. We just had a bit of Veuve Clicquot... not sitting in a famous bench, but anyhow... ;))

Blogtrotter is now showing that Reykjavik is not entirely grey... ;)). Enjoy and have a fabulous weekend!

ninabakke said...

Morsomt :)

Fine bilder!

Barbara Martin said...

Patti Abbott left a comment on my bench post that she had one too. Please visit her blog at:
http://pattinase.blogspot.com/2009/08/bench-of-week-for-barbara-martin.html

A very innovative bench fit for the best of gardens.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Rune-I will post the small one in my front yard in your honor. But I am not nearly the photographer that you are.

Stephany said...

Great photos! The half log benches are very creative. The reflections in the window are lovely.

Ida said...

Minner...
"Finn et strå og træ dom på"....

Det er et trist syn når slike bygg forfaller. Spesielt med tanke på ildsjelene du forteller om, som satte det i stand igjen etter mange år. Både politikere og storsamfunnet burde bli mye flinkere til å ta vare på slike "skatter" som dette.
Om enda noen år vil vi både ønske og sette pris på slike hus i distriktene. Hus med sjel og historie.