Friday, July 17, 2009

Bench of the week (17)

This week's bench can be be viewed in various contexts - a mixture of public and personal aspects. As you can see it is marked ULEFOS. This means that it comes from Ulefos Jernværk (iron works). This was founded in 1657 and is one of the oldest industrial works still operating in Europe. They are perhaps most famous for there ovens, but as you can see they also make benches.

However, this is a fairly common park bench in Norway, and I have probably shown one of these before. What is special with this one is the place I found it: In a small churchyard.

This is Askvik kapell (Askvik "chapel"), a small chapel with its own cemetery. The cemetery is from 1896, but a chapel was initially built in 1918 and consecrated in 1926. A new church with a new cemetery was built elsewhere in the '90s. The old chapel was allowed to deteriorate by the authorities, but a local committee raised the funding for the necessary repairs in time for the 80 years jubilee in August 2006.

And the personal aspect? Many members of my family lies buried here.


My own interest in benches stems from the site published by PERBS and Kerri and the site published by Malyss. Also, others have shown an interest in the subject, so I have started to take photos of benches when I "stumble" across one. I have not made this into a meme, but if anyone else would like to join me in publishing benches on Fridays, they are of course welcome to do so. Give me a hint and I'll come visiting - summer permitting :-)

28 comments:

Raph G. Neckmann said...

That is a very sturdy and also elegant looking bench. It looks quite comfortable too. It must be a very meaningful place for you to sit, in this churchyard - thank you for sharing.

Marka said...

'tis a beautiful chapel. I've always found the smaller and more rustic churches to be more conducive to pondering life's questions and to commune with God.

Phoenix C. said...

What a beautiful and tranquil spot, and how good to be able to sit on the bench and contemplate in such surroundings.

ChrisJ said...

A very smart and sleek bench.

The church is neat and compact too.

I guess that was my overall impression of Norway too--smart, sleek, clean, neat and compact.

Dina said...

Oh what a fine place for one's final rest.
And a bench with a history. So many years of ironworks.
So glad the people saved the lovely chapel. Enjoy this quiet place, Rune!

Barbara Martin said...

A beautiful, sturdy bench in a location which affords a peaceful contemplation of life. An interesting background to the bench and location.

My bench is up, RuneE.

PERBS said...

What an elegant bench! I love the color too -- it is just perfect for this historical spot. I enjoyed reading about the tie in to your own family!

I have my bench up early because I am going camping with Katney Friday and will be gone for several days. I will search out each person't bench post when I get back if I haven't found them before I leave. Please drop by and see my post from the Farmers Market this time. Thanks! Don't forget that Kerri and I share the blog and she might post a bench for this on Friday also like she did last time -- so visit both of ours IF she does,

Malyss said...

How a bench can lead to a simple and moving story..Your post offers two marvellous places to rest, one for a few hours, one for some more time..
There's nothing sad in that place, only serenity and peace.
I'm glad to see that some people took time and attention to save this lovely chapel.

PS: I discovered only this morning your so gentle comment on my blog. Thank you so much for your nice words!

Dagrun said...

Dette var et utrolig idyllisk sted, RuneE. Ulefosovn hadde vi i mitt barndomshjem. Flotte ovner det... Og dette var en flott benk også.

Ha en fin sommerhelg :)

Your EG Tour Guide said...

A bench in a churchyard with much history! A great find, Rune.

Surprise! I have a bench up today too.
http://eastgwillimburywow.blogspot.com/2009/07/waiting-bench.html

Dina said...

OK, I just posted a bench with a story, albeit ugly.
Such is reality in the "Holy City."

nonizamboni said...

I enjoyed these photos of Norway's history. And your bench motif has jarred me loose from my usual 'doors and fences'--now I'll be looking for unque benches to share. Thanks!

Cloudia said...

What wonderful country and tasty photos - glad I visited!

You are invited to Waikiki anytime.

Aloha Runee

Comfort Spiral

Rune (Bildebloggen) said...

Det visste jeg ikke at Ulefos lager benker også. Det var en nydelig benk :) God helg Rune.

Kerri said...

Oh what a LOVELY LOVELY bench! Love those arms!! And such a beautiful setting beside that stone wall.
Quite a LOVELY chapel too!

Prospero said...

What a glorious site for that little chapel. The fact that you have a personal attachment to it has allowed you to photograph it so lovingly.

Dina said...

Thanks for your comment, I agree. Yes, too bad for the "innocent benches." Now I understand why so many of Jerusalem's public benches are all metal and not wood.

Only now I looked at your links. Wow, your church is on beautiful water.

FA said...

Kudos to the locals for realizing the value of this chapel and saving it. I combined Bench Friday with Skywatch Friday at MonasteryDP. Please stop by when you have a moment.

AVCr8teur said...

I didn't realize how huge the chapel is until you took a side view of it. And, they did a nice job in restoring it. I don't usually pay attention to benches as I walk pass them, but after seeing your posts, I might have to give them a second look next time.

imac said...

Wonderful post and bench Rune, also very nice story and history of the church + many memories there.

David Cranmer said...

Elegant looking bench and the stone wall certainly accompanies it well.

And once again thanks for allowing me to join in the fun this week.

Ackworth born said...

I'm so glad they restored the church - abandoned graveyards are so sad.

Gallow said...

Thank you for the idea for photographing benches. I'm going to watch for other benches to take photographs. My only one so far is:

http://gallow-photo-year.blogspot.com/2009/07/week-11-day-77-july-16-2009-long-lake.html

Abe Lincoln said...

I love these old benches with the iron ends. I have one here but the oak has gone to pot over the years. Still, I will in a pinch, park myself on it rather gingerly. So far it has held my weight. LOL

Now, you and your friends can help me Make History. I am trying to see if it is possible to get 10,000 visitors in a short period of time on my new blog, Pick a Peck of Pixels. If you go there, please either become a ollower or leave a comment. Your visit will count and help me Make History. Pick a Peck of Pixels

Barrie said...

The iron works company has been around since 1657!!!? Wow! If I come across an interesting bench, I will definitely take its picture.

Gallow said...

The church photos are wonderful. I really like the coloring on the roof. Here's my second bench of the week.

http://gallow-photo-year.blogspot.com/2009/07/week-12-day-80-july-19-2009-bodlt.html

Kate said...

A very "sophisticated-looking" bench, I must say. It's lovely, and such a good idea to take photos of the variety of benches.

I was particularly interested in the church and its environment. Visiting a cemetery reveals so much about an area. My entire family is buried in a small church cemetery in a very small European-type village in northeastern Wisconsin. Whenever I visit the area, I stop. It's restful and peaceful there.

Ida said...

Et personlig sted for deg dette, skjønner jeg.
Både benken og stedet er flotte.
Bildene dine likeså.
Fine perspektiv og vinkler.
Dette kan du.
Å fotografere.

Håper du har gode stunder også, når du går der og minnes det som var og dem som sto deg nær.

P.S.
Den benken er nok mer solid, enn min her ute, som ligner,
men som er kjøpt på OBS Bygg. ;)