Sunday, December 28, 2008

Amalie Skram

Bergen has its share of statues. As usual they depict politicians and various cultural personalities, most commonly men. One of the few made to commemorate a woman is this one of the female writer Amalie Skram. Wikipedia describes her literary life like this:

In 1882 Amalie Skram debuted under the name Amalie Mueller with Madam Høiers Leiefolk. Her work continued until her death. She dealt with topics she knew well.

Her work can be divided into three categories:

  • Novels concerning marriage, which explored taboo topics such a female sexuality, and the subservient status of women in that period. These works was received by many as overly provocative and resulted in open hostility from some segments of society.
  • Multi-generation novels, which dealt with the fate of a family over several generations. With these she explored the social institutions and conditions of the time and campaigned for change.
  • Mental hospital works such as Prof Hieronimus and Paa St. Jørgen, which deal with the primitive and brutal conditions of such institutions of the period. Her novels created a major stir in Denmark and precipitated improvements in these institutions.

She is recognized as one of the early and strong proponents of what has come to be known as the women's movement, setting the early European early trend. Her works, which had been generally forgotten with her death, were rediscovered and received strong recognition in the 1960s. Several of her works are currently available in recent translations to English.

The Statue was made by the female sculptor Maja Refsum in 1949 and is placed at "Klosteret" on "Nordnes" in Bergen

15 comments:

Petunia said...

Amalie Skram, en stor liten dame, som var lenge forut for sin tid og ble ikke "forstått" av sine omgivelser.
Flott bilde Rune av en flott dame!
Hadde tenkt å ta bilde av henne, men du var raskest!

Anemone said...

Lest litt av den damen der ja...,
men statuen har jeg aldri sett.

Reader Wil said...

Amalie was very important for women all over the world, I think. I wish that there was an Amelie in some of those African and Asian countries where women are treated as third rate citizens, while they work harder than their husbands. This is a very interesting post Rune! Thanks for writing it.

mrsnesbitt said...

Great Stuff!
Lets here it sisters!

detroit dog said...

Yay!

Mediterranean kiwi said...

this looks very dramatic and overbearing, giving a serious nature to amelie - she had such a short life, so sad...

Abraham Lincoln said...

Interesting post to read and the photo is excellent as usual.

Sara said...

Her work sounds intriguing and I shall be looking for some of those English translations.

Sara

Rune said...

Flott bilde og tekst. Man lærer stadig noe nytt :o)

Takk for kommentar i dag, jeg er ikke klonet vekk i kula :o)

Rocky Mtn. Girl said...

Lovin' this post! Very interesting indeed!!!

AVCR8TEUR said...

People including myself walk by statues in the park or on the street without a second thought. Glad you took the time to educate us about Amalie.

Hope you had a nice holiday and is over your flu. Take care!

Kerri said...

Gorgeous shot!! I LOVE the benches on both sides of the statue too!!

To answer your last comment about whether I am satisfied with the 105mm Macro....I've never had anything else as a true Macro "fixed" lens. I've always used zoom lenses. It is taking a bit to get used to the fixed lens....but I am LOVING it!!

Ida said...

En stor forfatter, som det er verdt å lese.
Og en stor fotograf!
Ett fantastisk fint bilde dette! :)
Lyset, alle momentene, ja hele komposisjoen. Flott! :)

PERBS said...

Thanks for telling me about this post -- somehow I missed it before. Probably because we had snow and I was out playing in it and didn't see it when I checked blogs again. I am surprised that Kerri didn't link it to our blog back then! I see she posted a comment. The two identical benches are perfect on each side of the statue of an important leader of the women's movement. They are unique in that I have never seen an iron bar on the bottom connecting the legs. Interesting iron arms also! Thanks for telling me about this one and I will link it also so Malyssa can see it too. She likes your blog very much!

Malyss said...

What you say about Amalia's work makes me think a little about Jane Austen, the english writer who also wrote a lot about the marriage, the women in society, and all the problems they got to exist.Austen got the chance to become famous out of the english borders, and is still very "fashion" even today;I never heard about Amalia but i'm glad to discover her.The fact the statue exists, and that you pictured it, is a little way to do hommage to her.And, by the way, your picture with the two benches is quite beautyful..